Trends that are Shaping the Future of Autonomous Vehicles

The Quintessential Technology Source for Corporate Financial Professionals

Trends that are Shaping the Future of Autonomous Vehicles

CFO Tech Outlook | Tuesday, January 04, 2022

The immediate future is about iterative technology breakthroughs as well as the sociological and legislative structures that must be in place before the era of autonomous vehicles can become a reality.

Fremont, CA: Autonomous driving envisions a future in which traffic accidents and speeding penalties are no longer common. Mobility and the settings in which we live will be revolutionised as highways, towns, and cities are restructured to accommodate self-driving cars and trucks, as well as planes and boats. But we take a long way to go until we get there!

The immediate future is about iterative technology breakthroughs and the sociological and legislative structures that must be in place before the era of autonomous vehicles can become a reality. Meanwhile, automobiles and vehicles are becoming smarter and more connected in various ways, and these advancements will aid in some of the most exciting improvements to mobility and transportation in the coming year and beyond.

So, let's have a look at how autonomous and networked mobility will affect our lives in the near future.

Robotaxis will Become Popular

Most people's initial encounter with autonomous driving in a vehicle will most likely be a part of a private fleet hire or ride-sharing car rather than one they own. The introduction of self-driving taxis and ride-sharing services may have slowed in recent years due to the societal consequences of the COVID-19 outbreak. All indications are that it will get back on track in the next years, and big businesses remain confident that self-driving taxis will play a role in the future of personal urban mobility.

AI Monitoring Driver Behaviour

Outside of self-driving automobiles, one of the most promising applications for artificial intelligence (AI) in automotive engineering is monitoring driver attentiveness. Several automakers are now utilising in-car computer vision cameras to scan driver faces for tiny signs of exhaustion, which could promptly warn of fatigue that could lead to accidents. It's easy to see why this is seen as a vital use case in the industry, as weariness is said to play a role in up to 25 percent of significant and fatal road traffic accidents.

Weekly Brief